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Welcome to the MGO Group at RWTH Aachen University!

The research and teaching activities at our institute

Results are published

SIGGRAPH course

The course Directional Field Synthesis, Design, and Processing was taught in SIGGRAPH 2017.

Aug. 3, 2017

Octahedral Fields paper

Our paper Octaherdral Fields was presented in SIGGRAPH 2017.

Aug. 3, 2017

David Bommes obtained habilitation equivalence through the positive evaluation of his junior professorship.

July 1, 2017

David Bommes was elected as one of the newly established Eurographics Junior Fellows.

April 26, 2017

HexEx paper

Our paper HexEx was presented in SIGGRAPH 2016.

July 28, 2016

Prof. Dr. David Bommes received the Eurographics Young Researcher Award 2016.

In this years' edition of the European Association of Computer Graphics Conference, Eurographics 2016, held in Lisbon, Prof. Dr. David Bommes was granted the Young Researcher Award for his outstanding contribution to the field of quad mesh generation and optimization. (Link)

May 18, 2016

Recent Publications

Directional Field Synthesis, Design, and Processing

SIGGRAPH '17 Courses, July 30 - August 03, 2017, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Direction fields and vector fields play an increasingly important role in computer graphics and geometry processing. The synthesis of directional fields on surfaces, or other spatial domains, is a fundamental step in numerous applications, such as mesh generation, deformation, texture mapping, and many more. The wide range of applications resulted in definitions for many types of directional fields: from vector and tensor fields, over line and cross fields, to frame and vector-set fields. Depending on the application at hand, researchers have used various notions of objectives and constraints to synthesize such fields. These notions are defined in terms of fairness, feature alignment, symmetry, or field topology, to mention just a few. To facilitate these objectives, various representations, discretizations, and optimization strategies have been developed. These choices come with varying strengths and weaknesses. This course provides a systematic overview of directional field synthesis for graphics applications, the challenges it poses, and the methods developed in recent years to address these challenges.

 

Boundary Element Octahedral Fields in Volumes

ACM Transactions on Graphics

The computation of smooth fields of orthogonal directions within a volume is a critical step in hexahedral mesh generation, used to guide placement of edges and singularities. While this problem shares high-level structure with surface-based frame field problems, critical aspects are lost when extending to volumes, while new structure from the flat Euclidean metric emerges. Taking these considerations into account, this paper presents an algorithm for computing such “octahedral” fields. Unlike existing approaches, our formulation achieves infinite resolution in the interior of the volume via the boundary element method (BEM), continuously assigning frames to points in the interior from only a triangle mesh discretization of the boundary. The end result is an orthogonal direction field that can be sampled anywhere inside the mesh, with smooth variation and singular structure in the interior even with a coarse boundary. We illustrate our computed frames on a number of challenging test geometries. Since the octahedral frame field problem is relatively new, we also contribute a thorough discussion of theoretical and practical challenges unique to this problem.

 

Volumetric mesh generation from T-spline surface representations

Computer-Aided Design

A new approach to obtain a volumetric discretization from a T-spline surface representation is presented. A T-spline boundary zone is created beneath the surface, while the core of the model is discretized with Lagrangian elements. T-spline enriched elements are used as an interface between isogeometric and Lagrangian finite elements. The thickness of the T-spline zone and thereby the isogeometric volume fraction can be chosen arbitrarily large such that pure Lagrangian and pure isogeometric discretizations are included. The presented approach combines the advantages of isogeometric elements (accuracy and smoothness) and classical finite elements (simplicity and efficiency). Different heat transfer problems are solved with the finite element method using the presented discretization approach with different isogeometric volume fractions. For suitable applications, the approach leads to a substantial accuracy gain.

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